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Red-shouldered hawk rescue

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Kathy Gault, an Eglin endangered species biologist, and Kristin Smith, a Science Applications International Corporation environmental scientist, work together to rescue an entangled red-shouldered hawk in Turkey Creek March 2. A local resident spotted the bird while kayaking down Turkey Creek and reported the incident to natural resources personnel at Jackson Guard in Niceville, Fla. Ms. Gault and Ms. Smith worked for nearly an hour to release the bird. The bird was not injured. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heath Saxton)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- Kathy Gault, an Eglin endangered species biologist, and Kristin Smith, a Science Applications International Corporation environmental scientist, work together to rescue an entangled red-shouldered hawk in Turkey Creek March 2. A local resident spotted the bird while kayaking down Turkey Creek and reported the incident to natural resources personnel at Jackson Guard in Niceville, Fla. Ms. Gault and Ms. Smith worked for nearly an hour to release the bird. The bird was not injured. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heath Saxton)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --  The red-shouldered hawk breeds throughout the Eastern and Northeast U.S. into southern Canada. It is considered a migratory species and is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Adult hawks have a brown head, a reddish breast, a long tail and a pale belly with reddish bars. They mainly eat small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, small birds and large insects. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heath Saxton)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- The red-shouldered hawk breeds throughout the Eastern and Northeast U.S. into southern Canada. It is considered a migratory species and is protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Adult hawks have a brown head, a reddish breast, a long tail and a pale belly with reddish bars. They mainly eat small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, small birds and large insects. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heath Saxton)

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